Scotsburn Phoenix Project - Expressions of Interest

This is an opportunity for landholders affected by the December 2015 Scotsburn Fire to access funding to complete on-ground works to retore, rehabilitate or enhance the natural environmental burnt by the fire. Examples of activiites that will be considered for funding are revegetation of indigenous plants, protection of waterways, weed spraying, protection of remnant vegetation and erosion control.

Due to privacy law constraints The Leigh Catchment Group are not aware of all landholders affected by the fire. If you are intersted in completing works and being involved in this project we require you to complete and return the expression of interest form (available below) back to us as soon as possible, so we can commence the project.

Scotsburn Phoenix Project Expression of Interest Form

For more information please click on the flyer below:

Scotsburn Phoenix Project Information Flyer




Gardening Workshop

Sunday the 2nd of October 2016, 9:00am - 12:00pm, Scotsburn Hall.

Guest Presenter: Rob Pelletier

Free Event -BBQ Lunch provided

 

This is an opportunity to attend a Gardening Workshop that will provide information on re-establishing gardens after fire.

Rob Pelletier is a qualified horticulturist and has had extensive experience in civil and landscape construction, garden maintenance and fruit tree propagation. He is also well known to gardeners with over 35 years in horticultural media including radio, national television and writing for magazines and newspapers. After quitting the big smoke nearly 20 years ago Rob has farmed on the Mornington Peninsula and for the last 15 years at Beaufort where he operates a successful nursery selling traditional varieties of fruit trees nationwide. The business is called Heritage Fruit Trees. Rob can be currently heard on ABC radio every second Tuesday morning talking with Steve Martin about gardening and farming matters.

If you are interested in attending this event, please RSVP to Scotsburn Recovery Committee Member, Nick McKinley  TEL: 0455 147 398  or EMAIL:  or click on the following link:

 

Gardening Workshop Flyer

National Landcare Conference

To access the Climate Impact and Responses Presentation, please click on link below:

The role of Landcare in Fire Recovery, Preparing for Natural Disasters. Author Andrea Mason.

Bushfire Information

The Leigh Catchment Group (LCG) is keen to help property owners affected by the recent Scotsburn Fire.

Advice and information is available to fire affected landholders under the following five categories:

1. Fencing

2. Native plants and animals

3. Pest plant and animals

4. Agriculture (soils, pastures, stock)

5. River health and water quality

Click on a category for information, suggested actions and links to more detailed reports.

If you are interested in being a part of a future project such as revegetation, fencing, whole farm planning, monitoring, setting up nest boxes or anything else, please complete an LCG Expression of Interest Form.

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (Climate Impacts Responses_Pres_AndreaMason.pdf)Climate Impact ResponsesClimate Impact Responses1731 kB
Download this file (Garden Workshop Poster.pdf)Gardening WorkshopGardening Workshop493 kB
Download this file (LCG-ScotsburnPhoenixProject-FireRecobery-flyer-A4.pdf)Scotsburn Phoenix Project Flyer 3717 kB
Download this file (Letter from City of Ballarat Works on Pryors Road.pdf)Letter from City of Ballarat on Pryors Road WorksResponse to inquiry of status of fire recovery cleanup280 kB
Download this file (Phoenix Project Flyer.pdf)Phoenix Project Flyer 3717 kB
Download this file (Scotsburn Expression of interest.pdf)Phoenix Project Expression of Interest Form 580 kB
Download this file (Scotsburn Expression of interest.pdf)Phoenix Project Expression of Interest Form 580 kB
Download this file (Scotsburn Expression of interest.pdf)Phoenix Project Expression of Interest Form 580 kB

Boundary fencing is immediately required for property protection and stock control.

Internal fencing is one of the less urgent but essential tasks in getting farms back and running. After a fire, there is an opportunity to rethink your property layout such as changing fence lines and review short and long term goals for your farming operation. Whole Farm Planning may assist with this process.

ACTIONS

1

BlazeAid works alongside rural families to help   rebuild fences that have been damaged or destroyed by the recent fires. If   you require assistance please contact BlazeAid   or telephone David on 0419 875 432.

2

Before erecting internal fencing consider   reviewing your property layout or developing or updating a whole farm plan.   There are two 6 week courses (called FarmPlan 21) running in Moriac and Colac   starting in Feb 2016. Click here for more information. Alternatively send in an Expression of   Interest Form if you would like to have a local course provided.

3

The Corangamite CMA is currently seeking funding   to assist landholders in waterway fencing and revegetation in the fire   affected areas. More details to follow. If interested please send in an   Expression of Interest Form.

4

If stock now have access to   waterways, these areas may be a priority for fencing to reduce erosion and   protect any existing vegetation.

5

Consider wildlife friendly fencing   by reducing the use of barbed wire and making fences more visible in wildlife   hotspots.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The following documents are listed on the Victorian Landcare Gateway website in the fencing section. Click here to access or click on the document heading below.

Repair of fences control lines after bushfire

Repair of fences damaged by bushfire and fire control line rehabilitation policy 2014

Landcare after the fires - Land Class Fencing

Wildlife Friendly Fencing

Wildlife Friendly Netting

Wildlife Friendly Fencing Education Resources

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful.

Native Plants

Native vegetation recovers well after fire but, depending on seasonal conditions, recovery may be slow. It is not worth revegetating natural bushland too soon.

ACTIONS

1

Don’t assume plants are dead. Wait and   see what plants survive before you plan to revegetate. Revegetation is a longer-term project, it could take up to a   year to see new growth.

2

Keep burnt or dead trees as they provide   valuable habitat for wildlife.

3

Leave burnt leaves on the ground as these   provide a protective layer over the soil.

4

Look out for new native plants such as   orchids that may appear for the first time as a result of the fire.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The following documents are listed on the Victorian Landcare Gateway website in the native flora and fauna section. To open click on the document heading below.

Landscaping for Bushfire (CFA)

Burnt trees - Will they re-grow?

Burnt trees - A valuable resource

Burnt trees and their leaf litter - Nature's protective barrier

Native Animals

Bushfires have a devastating impact on native wildlife. Providing habitat is the key to bringing back wildlife but this may take time as plants regenerate and new plantings grow.

ACTIONS

1

Consider placing nest boxes on your   property to provide bird and native animal habitat while the bushland   recovers.

2

Leave burnt and unburnt logs on the   ground and in waterways and this provides valuable habitat.

3

If required Wildlife Victoria has this 24   hour hotline 13 000 94535.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Land for Wildlife Notes. Nest boxes for wildlife.

Weeds

The risk of weed invasion increases after a bushfire as it provides a window of opportunity for competitive weeds to take advantage of extra light, space, nutrients and moisture caused by the absence of desirable plants such as native vegetation, crops or pasture. Weeds can also increase as a result of fire suppression, fire recovery and environmental events.

ACTIONS

1

Monitor for new   weed outbreaks.

2

As imported   hay can carry in weeds, feed stock in small and localised areas so they can   be regularly checked.

3

Take the   opportunity to treat new weed growth that was previously difficult to access   prior to the fire.

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful.

Pest Animals

There is an increased window of opportunity to control pest animals post fire, as their food source has been disrupted.

ACTIONS

1

Fire removes groundcover, so there is an opportunity   to map where rabbit burrows exist. A baiting program is appropriate for large   numbers. A warren ripping and fumigation program should follow.

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful.

Soils

After a fire the land is bare and rain can run off quickly carrying soil and debris. Silts fill up dams and the eroded land can take years to recover. Fence areas can be prone to erosion.

ACTIONS

1

Keep stock off paddocks until grass cover   is established.

2

Consider stock containment areas to allow   other areas to recover and reduce the erosion potential.

3

Try to slow water runoff with straw and   silt traps.

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful.

The following documents are listed on the Victorian Landcare Gateway website.

Landcare after the fires - Erosion Control

Managing erosion with temporary sediment traps & fences (DPI)

Sediment fencing factsheet (DPI)

Rice straw article - Victorian Landcare Magazine issue 49

Pastures

Fire changes pastures in different ways according to a number of different factors: the intensity of the fire; the pasture species; the fertility of the soil; the time of the autumn break and follow up rains.

There are several possible courses of action after a fire. The appropriate action will depend on the intensity of the burn, the condition of the pasture prior to the fire and the finance and time available:

  • Cool-moderate burn: The pasture should recover to its original density during the following year given adequate moisture and the absence of soil nutrient deficiencies.
  • Hot burn: In most cases it is probably best to wait a season and see how the pasture recovers before considering re-sowing. However, in some cases it may be a good opportunity to reliably direct drill new pasture species or top up the old pasture.
  • Very hot burn: Almost all plant material will be dead so the area should be cropped or re-sown to pasture following the fire.

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers pasture recovery.

For more detail refer to:

DPI Information Note AG0203: Pasture recovery after fire

Stock

Following fire, you need to decide between feed and agistment. If you decide to feed, containing stock will reduce animal stress, as well as soil and plant loss.

The biggest factor affecting resource damage during dry periods is the amount of vegetative cover retained to protect the soil. The value of removing stock from vulnerable areas during such times cannot be over-stated. Grazing and trafficking by stock can quickly reduce the cover to levels which set-up wind erosion problems.

It is important to act early as unconfined grazing and trampling will put considerable stress on land in an already vulnerable state. If vegetation is removed so that only about one third of the soil remains covered, wind will start blowing soil particles away. Trampling will aggravate the situation and the land will be predisposed to water erosion problems when it rains.

ACTIONS

1

Consider stock containment areas to allow   other areas to recover and reduce the erosion potential.

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful.

Agriculture Victoria has these information notes:

Information Note AG0858: Horses and Bushfires

Information Note AG1371: Assessing sheep after a bushfire

Information Note AG1370: Assessing cattle after a bushfire

Also refer to the Victorian Landcare Gateway website and go to Resources - For Land Managers - Fire Recovery Resources for Landholders – Livestock.

Cool-moderate burn: The pasture should recover to its original density during the following year given adequate moisture and the absence of soil nutrient deficiencies.

Hot burn: In most cases it is probably best to wait a season and see how the pasture recovers before considering re-sowing. However, in some cases it may be a good opportunity to reliably direct drill new pasture species or top up the old pasture.

Very hot burn: Almost all plant material will be dead so the area should be cropped or re-sown to pasture following the fire.

River Health

While devastation to the land is a highly visible consequence of fire, rivers are also affected because surrounding catchment condition is critical to river health.

The immediate impact of the fires themselves may appear to be minimal, however there are several key ways in which stream ecosystems can be affected by fires. These include changes in flows, sedimentation from soil and ash, and algal blooms from increase nutrients from sediments and less shade from vegetation.

The biggest issue can often be not the severity of the fire but by whether heavy rains followed, washing large amounts of ash and sediment into the river, and whether the fire left unburnt areas that allowed river life to take refuge and recolonize

ACTIONS

1 If not already, get involved in the monitoring   of your creeks and rivers on your property or in your area. Please contact   your local waterwatch coordinator for more information at .
2 If stock now have access to   waterways, these areas may be a priority for fencing to reduce erosion and   protect any existing vegetation.

 

Water quality

After a fire, ash and soil from paddocks with inadequate groundcover may be blown into dams causing poor water quality for stock. Once in the water, organic materials provide ideal food for bacteria and algae.

ACTIONS

1

Consider getting your dam water tested

2

Aerate dam water if required

3

Set   up silt traps around dams

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

In 2009, the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) produced a report called ‘Recovery after fire. Practical steps for landholders’. This document covers many topics and may be useful